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Monday Notes

You’re My Everything, a ballad from the Miles Davis point of view

[Note di lunedì n.22] Miles Davis was the most visionary and prolific band leader jazz music has ever produced. A musician who is impossible to classify, from his debut as a bopper alongside Charlie Parker he changed styles repeatedly with exceptional results, moving through modal jazz, electric and experimental jazz-rock, to rap and pop. We…Continue readingYou’re My Everything, a ballad from the Miles Davis point of view

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Monday Notes

Bud Powell, Tempus Fugit

[Note di lunedì n.20] Bud Powell realised on the piano the innovations that Charlie Parker and Dizzy Gillespie had experimented with on wind instruments. Powell was an exceptional pianist but also an accomplished composer. Let us listen to and analyse his piece Tempus Fugit.Continue readingBud Powell, Tempus Fugit

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Monday Notes

Lester Young Teddy Wilson All of Me

[Monday Notes n.15] All of me is one of the first songs that aspiring jazz singers learn. The melody is simple and graceful, the phrases symmetrical and easy to remember, the tempo bright but not too fast. The song is so typical that its simple melody immediately evokes the 1920s and the swing era.Continue readingLester Young Teddy Wilson All of Me

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Monday Notes

Ella Fitzgerald, A Tisket a Tasket

[Monday Notes] Ella Fitzgerald is one of the most important jazz singers, her Song books are monumental and must-have works, her vocal improvisations a model for any aspiring jazz singer. However, it was not a song that launched her to success in 1938 but a simple nursery rhyme entitled A Tisket, a Tasket.Continue readingElla Fitzgerald, A Tisket a Tasket

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Monday Notes

Pennies From Heaven, Teddy Wilson and Bille Holiday

[Monday Notes] Teddy Wilson was a piano virtuoso but rarely showed off his skills, always playing elegantly and simply. We hear him with Billie Holiday in a lovely song called Pennies From Heaven.Continue readingPennies From Heaven, Teddy Wilson and Bille Holiday

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Monday Notes

Dizzy Gillespie, Salt Peanuts

[Monday Notes n.12] Singer Billy Eckstine gave the leadership of his orchestra to Dizzy Gillespie in 1944. Swing orchestras used to perform a catchy, danceable repertoire, but Dizzy was constantly experimenting with new and daring sounds. One night the audience rose up, complaining about the many instrumental pieces and demanding a sing-along. Dizzy, who had…Continue readingDizzy Gillespie, Salt Peanuts

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Monday Notes

Charlie Parker with Jay McShann, The Jumping Blues

[Monday Notes n.11] Let’s listen to one of young Charlie Parker’s first recordings with the orchestra of pianist and blues singer Jay McShann, dated 1940, a piece entitled The Jumping Blues.Continue readingCharlie Parker with Jay McShann, The Jumping Blues

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Monday Notes

Charlie Christian and the electric guitar, Rose Room

[Monday Notes n.10] One day clarinetist Benny Goodman was confronted with a joke: during one of his concerts, the young guitarist Charlie Christian was brought on stage. Distrustful of this uninvited guest, Benny Goodman started playing an old tune called Rose Room, convinced that he would catch the intruder off guard and force him to…Continue readingCharlie Christian and the electric guitar, Rose Room

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Monday Notes

Count Basie, One ‘O Clock Jump

[Monday Notes n.9] Count Basie’s music has its roots in Kansas City and in the blues. His contribution to the development of jazz was remarkable, both for his innovations in the rhythm section and for his use of riffs, i.e. repeated phrases, very simple and effective, which can be adapted to different chords without the…Continue readingCount Basie, One ‘O Clock Jump

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Monday Notes

Coleman Hawkins, Body and Soul

[Monday Notes n.6] Although a European invention, the saxophone was widely used in jazz music and it was jazz musicians who developed its sound and technique. Coleman Hawkins, the father of the tenor saxophone, experimented with many techniques during his career: slap tongues, glissando, staccato, vibrato on long notes, wide register excursions. To better understand…Continue readingColeman Hawkins, Body and Soul

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