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Piano

Why do jazz musicians like Bach so much?

Of all European classical composers, the one who enjoys the greatest popularity among jazz musicians is certainly Johann Sebastian Bach. Let us try to answer this question: why do jazz musicians like Bach so much?Continue readingWhy do jazz musicians like Bach so much?

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Monday Notes

In the Wee Small Hours, a concept album by Frank Sinatra

[Monday Notes n.170] In the Wee Small Hours is a 1955 Frank Sinatra album, with arrangements by Nelson Riddle. This work anticipates the concept albums of the 1960s and 1970s. It is in fact not a simple collection of songs, but a coherent and well-structured work, dealing with themes such as the end of a…Continue readingIn the Wee Small Hours, a concept album by Frank Sinatra

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Piano

On Piano Playing, Gyorgy Sandor and piano technique

On Piano Playing is a book by Hungarian pianist Gyorgy Sandor, published in 1981. Born in Budapest on Sept. 21, 1912, the pianist was a pupil of Béla Bartók and Zoltán Kodály and went on to become a concert pianist of international standing. Let us try to analyze his book and draw some useful lessons…Continue readingOn Piano Playing, Gyorgy Sandor and piano technique

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Piano

Hanon, The Virtuoso Pianist. When and how to study it

Hanon yes or no? Is it useful to study the 60 exercises of Hanon, The Virtuoso Pianist? In this lesson we will see when is the right time to start Hanon and how to study it correctly, avoiding wasting time but also working wrongly and risking injury.Continue readingHanon, The Virtuoso Pianist. When and how to study it

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Monday Notes

Chopin waltz in A minor, four simple harmony lessons

[Monday Notes n.169] Chopin’s Waltz in A minor, Opus B.150, is one of the easiest pieces to play in the great composer’s repertoire. It is very simple and clear even in its harmony, so it lends itself to being used as an example to understand four fundamental concepts of music: the cadence, the modulation, the…Continue readingChopin waltz in A minor, four simple harmony lessons

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Monday Notes

Vasco Rossi, Va bene, va bene così. Giving space to the band… it pays off

[Monday Notes no.168] Vasco Rossi is one of the Italian singer-songwriters who most divides the audience: many love him, just as many dislike him. In fact, his music has characteristic features, unique in some respects, which can support opposing opinions and reviews. I have tried to analyze his song Va bene, va bene così, highlighting…Continue readingVasco Rossi, Va bene, va bene così. Giving space to the band… it pays off

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Monday Notes

A Whiter Shade of Pale, all in one scale, like Bach

[Monday Notes no.167] A Whiter Shade of Pale is a classic Procol Harum song, the song that launched the band in 1967. While American rock is mainly inspired by the blues, British rock has always maintained a close relationship with classical music. No wonder, then, that A Whiter Shade of Pale is largely derived from…Continue readingA Whiter Shade of Pale, all in one scale, like Bach

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Monday Notes

Napule è, Pino Daniele sings of his home town

[Monday Notes no.166] Napule è is part of Pino Daniele’s first album Terra mia, released in 1977. The Neapolitan composer was inspired by the blues and jazz repertoire but did not deny his origins, which he proudly claimed by singing in Neapolitan dialect. It is therefore not surprising that Pino Daniele dedicated the first track…Continue readingNapule è, Pino Daniele sings of his home town

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Monday Notes

Che cosa c’è, Gino Paoli and the turnaround

[Monday Notes no.165] Many of Gino Paoli’s songs are based on a chord sequence that is known in harmony as a turnaround. This is the case for example in Il cielo in una stanza, Sapore di sale and La gatta, probably his most famous songs. Che cosa c’è also employs the turnaround, but in a…Continue readingChe cosa c’è, Gino Paoli and the turnaround

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Music Lessons

Wu Dao-Gong, Treatise on the Hexagram

In his Treatise on the Hexagram, the Chinese musician Wu Dao-Gong proposes the adoption of a music notation system alternative to the pentagram. The idea is very ingenious, let us see how it works.Continue readingWu Dao-Gong, Treatise on the Hexagram

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